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::making a successful presentation::

Tell them what you're going to tell them.

The first part of your presentation should introduce the audience to yourself, the subject, and the format of the presentation. Start by telling them who you are, and what you are going to discuss. Let the audience know how you will present the material -a didactic lecture, an interactive discussion, a question and answer session. This helps in getting and holding their attention.

Tell it.

The main content of the presentation should be delivered in a logical manner. For a research paper, this means going through the aims, methods, results and discussion. A case should follow the established history, examination, investigations, differential diagnosis and conclusions format. If using slides, keep them uncluttered. Avoid reading the slides word for word - the audience can read, and it is extremely dull to watch someone go through several paragraphs of small text of the screen. Learn your material so that you can display key points, and talk around these. Engage the audience, by putting questions or by canvassing opinions. This will help them stay alert and interested. Keep the content focused - trying to cover too many points often loses the listeners.

Asking the audience if they have questions is one way to bring some interactivity to the presentation. You must be ready to answer most of the questions yourself, but be prepared to divert any difficult ones to a member from your team, or open it up to the floor - seniors often love to provide answers when a colleague is stumped!

Tell them what you've told them.

It is important to have a definite ending to your presentation - the best way to do this is to summarise what has been covered. It may be preferable to do this after the questions and answers, as it allows you to bring the audience back to the key messages. Discussions and debates from questions often go off on a tangent Research shows that the first and last parts of any presentation are the most likely to be remembered, so you may wish to leave the audience with a short "take home" message - one line or sentence that you want to stay with them. 

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